Category: Blog

DEMULTIPLEXIA

BrainDance performance “Demuliplexia” had its premier on 14th of September at Bozar Electronic Arts Festival, BEAF’17 in Brussels. It happened within the framework of EU2017.EE – Estonian Presidency of the Council of the
European Union and 100 years of Estonian republic, EV100.EE.

The work on the performance started actively from March 2017. TLU team
of BrainHack used this work as a platform to observe
and learn from art-science collaborations that often took place as short
(2-3 day) or long-term residencies of several months (e.g. work with Mr.
Yury Didevich, Dr. Alberto Novello and Fine 5 dance company).

Technically, in DEMULTIPLEXIA performance two dancers are connected via
wearable EEG headsets (Nautilus) to a neurocinematic system, in which
audio-visual material is interactively assembled based on the reactions
from this two identities. The audience will be able to follow the fight
of multiple personalities on the screens and will know the possible
resolution of the story.

Scientifically, we explore several research directions. First, it is
semantic and Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) technologies where dancers
adapt to the BCI technology that they use over several month. Second, we
explore the ideas of neurochoreography, where apart from movement
expression, dancers now also have an additional expression channel based
on their physiological state. Third, we explore neurocinematic system
where physiology based real-time montage is based on the database cinema
concepts.

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The most important in this performance is that it represents a living
experiment on the stage, cybernetic system uniting several people,
outside the scientific lab conditions. Such example of art-science
collaboration in the theatre demonstrates completely new possibilities
to the neuroscientific research where different paradigms can be
prototyped, tested and changed in a convenient way. Detailed scientific
and popular science articles on the “DEMULTIPLEXIA” are on the way.

Author: Aleksander Valjamae

Brainhack @STARTS Estonian event & DART17

Brainhack project participated as one of the main actors in the STARTS event organised in the occasion of the Estonian Presidency to the European Council on September 14th 2017 in Brussels. The session dedicated to Brainhack was entitled “Art and the Brain: Towards Art-triggered Startups” and focus on STARTS actions which foster creative non-scientific applications of Brain-Computer Interfaces. The session included the première of the BRAINHACK short-documentary OpenMind by Anna Sanmartí and a pitching session of DART17-BRAINHACK edition candidates and announcement of the winners.
DART17 team – Arijana Walcott and Sophie Lamparter – traveled to Brussels to the final pitches and was impressed by the quality of the projects and the enthusiasm by all the interdisciplinary teams. This is DART 17’s first collaboration with the STARTS programme, an initiative by The European Commission supporting “Innovation at the nexus of Science, Technology, and the ARTS”.

The decision among so many talented groups pitching in Brussels was not easy. DART17 and the Brainhack project is excited to announce the DART 17 opportunity winner and new member of: RE/ME is multi-sensory technology and creative tool that enhances body awareness for well-being, and supports imaginative perception of your own body through physically altering your self-image.

The RE/ME team, Diego Maranan (University of the Philippines Open University/CogNovo), Agi Haines (Speculative Designer, Plymouth University), Sean Clarke (Independent Composer), will now be able to test its idea in the Silicon Valley eco-system, collect industry feedback and gain support to develop it back in Europe.

Author: Irene Ingardi

Brainhack DART17 pitching session & documentary

Brainhack DART17 pitching session & documentary @ Estonian Presidency STARTS event

The Brainhack project is outlined and participating as one of the main actors in the next STARTS event organised in the occasion of the Estonian Presidency to the European Council on September 14th in Brussels. The session dedicated to Brainhack is entitled “Art and the Brain: Towards Art-triggered Startups” and focus on STARTS actions which foster creative non-scientific applications of Brain-Computer Interfaces. The session includes the première of the BRAINHACK short-documentary OpenMind by Anna Sanmart í and a pitching session of DART17-BRAINHACK edition candidates and announcement of the winners.
Speakers announced are: Anna Sanmartí, director of OpenMind, Sophie Lamparter (DART17), Arijana Walcott (Swisscom/DART17), Luis Miguel Girao (Artshare).

DART17 and Brainhack
BrainHack partnered up with DART17, a testing Lab for interactive experiences, objects and tools in San Francisco and is currently offering in collaboration with the European Commission STARTS Initiative the possibility to apply and win a grant to participate in the DART17 program. The grant is specifically dedicated to the BrainHack Spinal projects, i.e. those projects that participated in HackTheBrain hackathons and showed exceptional potential for further development.
The winners of the DART17 opportunity will be announced during the Estonian Presidency STARTS event. Pitches are scheduled between 16:20-16:35 CET on 14/09 in Bozar (SALLES TERARKEN).
The Spinal projects representatives presenting in Brussels are:

  • Senscapes: Joe Barnby, Music Producer & PhD Candidate in Neuropsychopharmacology (King’s College London)
  • Bisensorial: Diego Maranan (University of the Philippines Open University/CogNovo), Agi Haines (Speculative Designer, Plymouth University), Sean Clarke (Independent Composer)
  • Human CentipEEG: Dr. Graham Healy, Data Analyst (Insight/ Dublin City University)
  • Labyrinth Psychotica: Jennifer Kanary Nikolov(a), Artistic Researcher (Labyrinth Psychotica) (video), Marie-Anne Soyez, Production and Management Assistant (Labyrinth Psychotica)
  • Second Brain: Martina Huynh, Designer
  • The DART17 program represents a clear opportunity for most of the Spinal teams to continue their project and focus on further developments beyond the hackathon model. The DART17 winning project will be able to test its idea in the Silicon Valley eco-system, collect industry feedback and gain support to develop it back in Europe.
    Registrations for the event are free and open via this link.

    Brainhacking underway in Dublin

    What is going on in Dublin?
    In the Science Gallery of Dublin, a big group of people is working together to Hack the Brain this weekend. In this event artists, designers, neuroscientists, experimental psychologists, engineers and developers work together in transdisciplinary teams to develop ideas into prototype artworks, objects, inventions or interfaces that use or harness brain signals and brain-computer interface (BCI) technology.

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    Loads of hard work!

    Nice. What are they working on?
    A lot of things actually. However the key is that great projects arise from the multidisciplinary cooperation that takes place. Here are some examples of the things that people work on:

    • Mind Anamorphosis: Virtual reality (VR) art allows a participant to experience disembodied presence in an immaterial, abstract space and when coupled with Brain Computer Interface it has the potential to allow a person to affect their virtual surrounding using their thoughts. We envisage the participant floating inside an immersive dreamscape VR environment, where the content of the virtual environment, visual, aural and motion can be controlled by, and responds to, the persons imagined movement. The focus will be on utilizing two waves in the alpha and beta range in primary sensorimotor cortex indicating motor intention or motor imagery of different body parts. The Mu rhythm which in the alpha range 7.5 to 12.5 Hz and the sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) in the range of 13 to 15 Hz both of which are dominant during rest but desynchronized when an individual is planning, executing, and imagining body movements.
    • Human CentipEEG: In Human CentipEEG, three individuals will – by virtue of their EEG – effectively become one organism responding to multisensory inputs in real time, with each person acting as one sense modality. Visual input will be perceived by the first person, and their resultant EEG signal will be converted into musical output; this music will be heard by the second person, whose elicited EEG will be converted to tactile vibrations; a third person will experience these tactile sensations, and their recorded EEG will be converted into the visual output perceived by the first person.

    These are just two examples. Of course, a lot more is going on. All projects are shared on github.com/hackthebrain

    Can I take part is such activities in the future?
    Yes! A lot of different parties are organizing events to make hacking the brain more accessible to different people. Through HacktheBrain-hub.com we aim to direct an interested crowd to these parties as much as possible. Some places to look for future events like this are therefore listed below:

    If you have suggestions for other Brianhacking events to list, then let us know!

    Brainhacking, ethics and fighting toxic prose

    At the Hackathon in Dublin this weekend, I’m interviewing participants in order to understand their perspectives on the ethical and aesthetic implications of BCI art and technology.

    It’s been fascinating to track the patterns of convergence and divergence in people’s responses; for instance, almost everyone agrees that scientists and artists have a great deal to teach each other, but I’ve heard a wide range of opinions about art’s role as a didactic tool.

    One particularly fruitful line of questioning has had to do with mediation. In theory, could tracking brain data give us direct access to someone’s emotions and states of mind? Or is this kind of information essentially incommunicable except through layers of mediation and metaphor? I’m looking forward to investigating these questions in more detail. In the meantime, wish me luck in my battle (pictured here) against toxic prose!

    By Veronica Alfano

    Sign up now for Hack the Brain Dublin!

    Hack the Brain Dublin (June 9-11th 2017) is an immersive creative hackathon weekend in Science Gallery Dublin which aims to get artists, designers, neuroscientists, experimental psychologists, engineers and developers working together in transdisciplinary teams to develop ideas into prototype artworks, objects, inventions or interfaces which use or harness brain signals and brain-computer interface (BCI) technology.

    CLICK HERE for all information about how to submit an idea to the open call, or to simply sign up as a participant.

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    BrainHack presented at TU Delft Brain Events

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    Hacking the Brain – Advancing Neuroscience through art

    Lucas Evers and Martijn Arts

    Can art and science collaborations lead to better understanding of neuroscience and neurotechnologies? Artists, scientists, hackers and the public collaborate on creative, ethical and no-clinical neurotech applications.

    Date Tuesday April 4
    Time 12.45 – 13.30
    Location: Aula Lecture Hall D, TU/delft
    Language: English

    Hack the Brain Dublin // June 9-11 2017

    Explore the art & science of brain-generated signals in the heart of Dublin city! Enjoy summer in Dublin the same way as the Irish do – indoors, out of the rain!

    WHAT: Create, explore, connect, learn, hack and build. Two full days in Dublin to experiment with brain-generated signals through the lens of art and science.
    WHEN: Saturday 10th & Sunday 11th of June (kick-off event Friday evening 9th of June)
    WHERE: Science Gallery Dublin, Pearse St, Dublin 2 (on Trinity College Dublin campus)
    WHO: Artists, designers, neuroscientists, experimental psychologists, engineers, developers, hackers, makers and anyone interested in exploring art and science using brain-generated signals.

    Hack the Brain Dublin is an immersive creative weekend in Science Gallery Dublin which aims to get artists, designers, neuroscientists, experimental psychologists, developers and engineer working together in transdisciplinary teams to develop ideas into prototype artworks, objects, inventions or interfaces which use or harness brain signals and brain-computer interface (BCI) technology.
    Teams work together to explore, collaborate, converse, and make work together over the course of the weekend. It doesn’t have to be complete or perfect, but something new will be made.

    From March 31st until May 8th, Science Gallery Dublin will invite submissions for Hackathon project ideas. 6 ideas will be selected by the curatorial panel, comprising representatives from the BrainHack consortium. Winning ideas will be announced May 12th. There will be a travel/accommodation bursary of up to €500 for the selected ideas.

    Preliminary Schedule:
    Friday June 9th:
    15.00-18.00: BCI clinic (drop-in workshops)
    18.00-20.00: Kick-off with invited speakers & jury members, introduction to projects from team leaders
    20.00-late: Social

    Saturday June 10th:
    09.00-20.00: Hacking (including intermediate pitching sessions)

    Sunday June 10th:
    09.00-18.00: Hacking
    18.00-19.00: Final pitches
    19.30-20.00: Awards ceremony
    20.00-late: Social event

    Sign up here to receive a reminder email when the general registration and Open Call for projects for Hack the Brain Dublin goes live: https://goo.gl/forms/pQLmdzRYtawsP8cT2

    For more information contact mairead.hurley@dublin.sciencegallery.com

    Photo credit: Memory of a Brain Malformation by Katharine Dowson, part of TRAUMA at Science Gallery Dublin.

    Fashion on Brainwaves

    Jasna Rokegem’s Fashion on Brainwaves (FOB) tries to connect fashion an brain technologies. Using BCI’s connected to clothing FOB tries to find new modes to communicate someones mood through what she, he is wearing.
    I am curious about her next applications where FOB not only shows a general visualisation of the mood of the wearer, but makes someone really understand that mood. You can find more about it on the project’s website.

    fashion-on-brainwaves-photo-koen-rok

    Also the Focus Factory project in which Rokegem was involved in 2015, 2016 is interesting. Focus Factory promises to measure your work focus in order to make you work more effectively and as such it is an interesting case of non-clinical use of BCI. I am curious about whether the team that made it has thoughts about the ethics of such an application as it may not be you who uses is for your benefit, but your employer, who might be oonly interested to boost you productivity for coprorate interest.